The latest issue of Discover Britain is on sale now

    Chatsworth House is said to be the inspiration for Jane Austen's Pemberley. Credit: Chatsworth
    Do you love Britain? Let others know!

    Was Castle Feb_March2016_Cover_OxfordAshby in Northamptonshire the “real” Mansfield Park? Recent research shows it might be and the latest issue of Discover Britain jumps at the excuse to explore Jane Austen’s sublime settings from the sweeping grounds of Chatsworth, said to be the inspiration for Pemberley, to her beloved Bath, where Austen, and her heroines, danced in the Assembly Rooms.

    We also go behind the scenes at Kensington Palace, home of Queen Victoria, Princess Diana and, today, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, to learn more about its exquisite sartorial treasures, take a insider’s spin around Oxford’s dreaming spires and meet the architects who built Britain and their wondrous creations from Banqueting House to St Paul’s Cathedral.

    In our dedicated London section, we wander down Portobello Road, the street made famous by Richard Curtis’s Notting Hill and, inspired by the recent BBC production of Sherlock, we pop in to 221B Baker Street to pay Mr Holmes a home visit.

    All that, plus discover why Dover Castle was dubbed “England’s key”, roam the majestic Yorkshire moors with Cathy and Heathcliff, take a whisky-tasting tour through the stunning Scottish Highlands and don’t miss your opportunity to WIN the holiday of lifetime to Britain

    Racliffe Camera and Brasenose College, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England.
    The Radcliffe Camera and Brasenose College, Oxford. Credit: VisitBritain/Britain on View
    The canvases were painted by Sir Peter Paul Rubens and installed in the hall in 1636. The three main canvasses depict The Union of the Crowns, The Apotheosis of James I and The Peaceful Reign of James I. The only surviving in-situ ceiling painting of Peter Paul Rubens is also one of the most famous from a golden age of painting.Two canvasses measure 28x20ft and two others 40x10ft.The ceiling was one of Charles I’s last sights before he lost his head. The King was executed on a scaffold outside in 1649.
    The ceiling at Banqueting House was one of Charles I’s last sights before he lost his head. The king was executed on a scaffold outside in 1649. Credit: Historic Royal Palaces
    In front of the east front public entrance stands a statue of Queen Victoria, sculpted by her daughter Princess Louise.
    Kensington Palace, where Queen Victoria grew up. Credit: Historic Royal Palaces
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    Portobello Market. Credit: Shutterstock
    View across a drystone wall across the landscape at Grassington, Yorkshire.
    View across a drystone wall across the landscape at Grassington, Yorkshire. Credit: VisitBritain/Tomo Brejc
    Islay is the southernmost island of the Inner Hebrides off the West Coast of Scotland. A board moored in shallow water. Shingle beach. Sunset.
    The tiny island of Islay is home to some iconic whisky distilleries. Credit: VisitBritain/Charlie Waite

    The February/March 2016 issue of Discover Britain is now on sale.

    Do you love Britain? Let others know!